New Orleans Ghost Tour Blog

Explore Haunted New Orleans

Marie Laveau, Queen of Voodoo

The infamous Voodoo priestess Marie Laveau lived a life shrouded in mystery.  Even the dates of her birth and death are hazy at best.  She would achieve everlasting notoriety in New Orleans and beyond, and is still said to haunt the city that she called home,...

Brennan’s Restaurant

Before it was a restaurant, Brennan’s was a luxurious French Quarter townhouse, built for Vincent Rilleaux, the painter Degas’ grandfather.  A later, more sinister owner, however, has refused to vacate the premises, frequently inserting himself into the dinner...

The Louisiana State Supreme Court

Built in 1910 to house the State Supreme Court, as well as various local courts, this Beaux-Arts building would rise in place of dozens of historic buildings on a block then cut in half by the Exchange Alley.  Abandoned by the courts for decades, it reopened as the...

New Orleans Pharmacy Museum

In 1823, Louis Dufilho became America’s first licensed pharmacist, opening his apothecary shop on Royal Street.  Today that shop holds the New Orleans Pharmacy Museum, with an extensive collection of antique pharmacy equipment and supplies, but also plays host to a...

O’Flaherty’s Irish Pub

This building was once scene to a love triangle gone horribly awry, an affair which still haunts the building to this day.  In the 1803 Mary Wheaton would buy this commercial and residential property with her first husband, who disappeared one day several months after...

The Phantom Bells

Here at 619 Chartres Street stood in 1780s the home of the Spanish Army Treasurer, Don Nunez. Inside this structure would begin the most devastating fire in the history of New Orleans, the Good Friday Fire of 1788. The ferocity of this blaze still haunts this location...

The Ghost of Pere Antoine

Forever pacing the alleyway which now bears his name, Pere Antoine is one of New Orleans most beloved, and often seen, apparitions. Sent by the crown in 1774 to run the Spanish Inquisition, this Capuchin monk named Antonio de Sedella quickly became known as a great...

The Singing Rain

In a city known for its often-ferocious tropical weather, there is naturally a haunting which is a wind-blown phenomenon.  The Singing Rain of New Orleans occurs whenever a violent tropical system comes blowing in off the Gulf of Mexico. This ghostly funeral...

Julie, the Octoroon Mistress

Throughout much of the 1700s and 1800s men of the Creole aristocracy would often take free women of color as their mistresses, carrying on affairs that would often last a lifetime.  The women would be given a home to live in, wealth, education, and slaves as part of...

The Witch of the Opera House

In the 1860s a young woman, Marguerite, made quite a splash on the scene as a performer at the French Opera House, which stood on the corner of Toulouse and Bourbon.  She was no great talent, but was quite fetching, and thus made quite a success of herself.  As she...

The Sultan’s Palace

The home at 716 Dauphine Street has been known to generations of New Orleanians as “The Sultan’s Palace”.  Owned by a wealthy planter, the home would be rented out in the 1870s to the younger brother of a Turkish sultan. He rented the home, claiming his brother would...

The Andrew Jackson Hotel

The ghosts staying at the Andrew Jackson Hotel are not trapped former guests – they predate the hotel building itself by many decades.  The spirits, five mischievous young boys, are said to have become attached to the location during the Good Friday Fire of 1788....